The threshold function allows you to set a sensitive range outside which the behaviour will not respond to incoming data. This is very useful where you want objects to only behave in a subset of events such as a light turning on above a value, or a dial which cuts off above a certain value. With this you can build ranges of objects which react to different parts of a data range, such as red-amber-green warning lights or a range of dials.

The Threshold Function is set from the Input Threshold Type dropdown, selecting Absolute. This opens three further settings – Input Minimum, Input Maximum and Threshold Behaviour.

  • Input Threshold Min: If the incoming value is below the number set here, it is ignored. You can set what the object does in this event by setting the Threshold Overflow Behaviour – see below.
  • Input Threshold Max: If the incoming value is above this number, it is ignored. You can set what the object does in this event by setting the Threshold Overflow Behaviour – see below.
  • Threshold Overflow Behaviour: When the incoming data moves outside the min/max range, you can choose the output value. The following example illustrates.

_Example: To create a graph bar, you have a cube mesh which is targeted by a DS BC Scale components, scaling it vertically on the Z-axis with a multiplier of 1.0. This means it changes height with the incoming data, which ranges from 0-100. You want the bar to only change between incoming values of 25-75.

  • Snap to Lower: When the bar goes outside the range (0-25 or 76-100), output value will be 25, and the height will always snap down to 25 height.
  • Snap to Upper: When the bar goes outside the range (0-25 or 76-100), output value will be 75, and the height will always snap up to 75 height.
  • Snap to Nearest Extent: When the bar goes below 25, output value will be 25 and the bar will snap down to 25 height. When the bar goes above 75, output value will be 75 and the bar will snap up to 75 height. In each case, when the number returns within the 25-75 range, the bar will seamlessly begin to respond again to the output within that range._

For most purposes the Snap to Nearest Extent is the best option as the object stays at the last known threshold awaiting the return of the data to within range.

Revision: 3
Last modified: May 21, 2021

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